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Interviews

Crysis

Crytek CEO Cevat Yerli, the man who commands Crysis, on the mic

After a childhood spent dabbling with simulation games and studying economics, Cevat Yerli (along with his brothers Avni and Faruk) set up Crytek in 1999. His name is pronounced 'chevat' rather than 'sevat', and if you say it wrong PR ladies frown at you...

So, in its current state, is Crysis everything you envisioned at the start of the project?

Cevat Yerli: At the very start, the game was probably a bit longer. Making the game longer would be no problem, but in order to have consistently high quality the game had to be condensed. It's a very, very busy game, with intense and pulsating gameplay. That's probably the only difference. On the upside, at the beginning I didn't dream we'd have both interactivity and photorealism...

Zoom

Is there much gameplay material that you're holding back from us?

Cevat Yerli: I think quite a few things; the ending for sure. You'll see that for yourself - it's big. I'm telling you, it's really big! Plus you've only seen the ice levels briefly, the zero-G levels we haven't shown anyone at all - and the aliens we'll never reveal. We'll hint to them, but never reveal them till you play.

The way the aliens are encased in metal shells is fairly tantalising...

Cevat Yerli: Yeah, those are their machines and vehicles. The real aliens live in zero-G. No-one's seen them yet. Maybe around May we'll hint at them in screenshots. But you won't see them properly until you play. And I'm telling you, the first time you see them you'll shit your pants! Imagine the last good horror game you played - this is going to be like that, but every time you play it'll be different.

And I guess the ability to switch between armour, speed, strength and all that adds to the freedom...

Cevat Yerli: Yes. The player doesn't only have to choose a weapon, as you can change the mode of the nano-muscle suit. The enemies will react to both your customised weapon and suit, plus the environment is interactive and thoroughly damageable. All of this creates emergent gameplay. If you have a certain tactic in mind, you can express it...

I was watching Batman Begins the other day, and thought the pre-spray batsuit was a little Crysis-like...

Cevat Yerli: When we designed the hero I said 'we don't want a tank. I don't want a Warhammer 40,000, Unreal Tournament or Halo hero.' They're all cool designs but I wanted something that expressed the gameplay.

I added muscle strains all over the body. When you move to a third-person view you can see how your suit adapts to the mode. Batman Begins was way later than when we were planning the game, but I guess in both cases it was about keeping it real - augmenting the change, not too bulky, wrapping it around the body. Real and cool.

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