Interviews

Bulletstorm

People Can Fly reveals a bundle about the craziest shooter around...

Oh yeah, 2010 is getting the top class 'serious' shooters by the trough-load.

Medal Of Honor, CoD: Black Ops, Halo: Reach - they're all fantastic for those that like to furrow their brow while they're saving the world.

But what about those of us that like to dish out our punishment with a healthy portion of daftness?

Where's the game where you can impale people on giant, spike wielding plants? Where you can slide-kick bizarre-looking guards on your arse? Hell, where a man can just exclaim, "You scared the dick off me!" when he feels like it?

Oh, there it is. Steaming up on the horizon like a barmy wheelbarrow full o'man meat showered in purdy glitter.

Bulletstorm, they call it. And although we have to wait until 2011 to taste its bonkers charms, it's already smelling pretty sweet.

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For starters, it's placed Epic Games in hog heaven - chucking around some the wildest, masculine-in-overdrive ideas ever seen in games with glee.

Heck, Cliffy bloody B is overseeing it. They normally give that job to a suit, you know. To calm things down.

Cliffy B is supposed to calm things down.

It's also guaranteed to have a bloody great '18' sticker on the front of it - with the emphasis on the 'bloody', thanks to a brutal if hilarious combo kill system.

But perhaps most tellingly, Polish studio and Painkiller creator People Can Fly is creating it. It's not a workplace that holds back easily.

As our exclusive Q&A with the firm's founder Adrian Chmielarz demonstrates, this really is the game where anything goes...

How much input has Epic had into the game?
This is a true co-operation. This is PCF's game, right? We initiated the ideas, we came up with the universe, the skill shots and the weapons and all that. But Epic - not every single one - but a lot of people from Epic are involved.

Tanya Jessen was producer on Gears and is producer on Bulletstorm right now. Mike Capps - the head of Epic - is playing the build every single week. Chris Perna created the artwork for us. And there's obviously Cliff, right?

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Cliff isn't just reviewing stuff. I mean, he does say: "That blows. This is big. That's great - more of that!", which helps us because he is a great creator. But he also has his own ideas.

Epic is very powerful and they're powerful for a reason - they're doing something right and people love their games. So you have somebody like this helping you with your project, it's great.

We're seeing a lot of FPS games at the moment. What differentiates Bulletstorm from any other game out there from your perspective?
First, I don't believe things need to be different. You don't necessarily need to have a new gameplay element all the time, right? It's like demanding from the movies: 'Why are you using the same camera as you used last year?'

But having said that, luckily for us we have something that's totally different to every shooter released or that will be released in the near future.

For the last 500 years, shooters have followed the same principle: Here is an obstacle in the form of an enemy. You're shooting to remove the obstacle and move forward. Basically, if your sidekick kills an enemy, two thumbs up, great job, man I've saved some ammo.

In Bulletstorm, the skillshots mean that you when you 'just' kill the guy, something's wrong. It's an FPS, you have great weapons and you've just killed the enemy very efficiently and quickly - but you're not happy.

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