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Next gen Xbox motion control kits 'in circulation'

But 'Kinect 2' details remain a closely guarded secret

Select games studios across Europe are working on "the next generation of motion control" with new development kits, CVG has learned.

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According to a games developer familiar with the situation, Microsoft has already briefed a number of studios on the next phase in its motion control initiative. Future Xbox plans are so tightly guarded, however, that the source has not seen the development kits in person.

It is not yet clear whether Microsoft will use technologies similar to Kinect for its next-gen motion control plans.

Previously leaked documents drafted in 2010 suggested that Microsoft was planning to double-up on Kinect's capabilities by using 'stereo sensor imaging' - a new technology that uses two separate cameras and microphones to create "full-body hi precision" motion control for multiple players at the same time.

The tag line in the document was "closer, wider, deeper".

The report added that a "dedicated processor", improved microphone, and enhanced RGB cam means that 'Kinect 2' will allow for "four players, sitting or standing" as well as sophisticated technology that can register props such as baseball bats.

Microsoft has sold about 18 million Kinect units, according to the most recent data.

In July last year it began recruiting for work on 'next gen natural user interface'.

In August a Twitter user appeared to have leaked a sample image of Kinect 2 running on a Durango (new Xbox codename) development kit. The image shows two users interacting with Kinect and what appears to be an increased amount of depth and movement data.

The image appeared to suggest that the next Kinect can track individual fingers and the shape of clothes.

In 2011, Sony Worldwide Studios boss, Shuhei Yoshida claimed that existing motion control technologies were "in their own 8-Bit era" - meaning that he felt such devices had significant scope to improve.

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