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Microsoft removes offline Xbox One system update method

Alternative USB method let players update without connecting via a console

Microsoft has removed the offline system update file for the Xbox One, as well as the page detailing how to use it.

"The site was not an alternative way to take the Day One update and customers still need to connect to Xbox Live for the update," a spokesperson told Eurogamer.

"Because of the complexity of this customer support process we've actually removed the page and we will work with customers directly to make sure they have a smooth experience."

Original story

Microsoft has provided a precautionary method for updating Xbox One as its servers prepare for a surge of traffic at launch.

The "Emergency Offline Update" method is recommended for players who find themselves struggling to connect their system online. The data is downloaded to a USB stick and can be read by the new console.

Zoom

To install the update, customers will need a USB flash drive formatted as NTFS with a minimum 2 GB of space, as well as a PC with an internet connection and a USB port.

Players must also first check which OS version their Xbox One is running and download the appropriate update from the Emergency Offline Update site. They must then insert the USB drive into a powered-off Xbox One, then switch it on while holding the Eject and Bind buttons. This forces the Xbox One to look for a USB drive update instead of booting up.

At the time of going to press, users are reporting that the download link for the USB content is not working

The full list of instructions, as well as the update file, can be found here.

Microsoft launches Xbox One across thirteen countries at midnight on Thursday.

You can read CVG's full Xbox One review here, where we say: "Just like the PlayStation 4, Microsoft has crafted a games platform that builds upon long-standing conventions instead of reinventing them. For many, this homogeneity is exactly what they asked for, but whether old solutions can hold out for another decade is another matter entirely."

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