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Steam Greenlight to 'go away' as publishing restrictions are relaxed, says Newell

Valve boss hints at irrelevance of voting system as Steam 'evolves'

Valve hopes to render Steam Greenlight defunct by gradually eroding the blockades between small developers and Steam publishing.

Steam Greenlight launched in August 2012, designed as a system to enable small developers to attain Steam publishing rights via community voting.

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Greenlight allows users to vote on game projects and concepts posted by indie developers that they would like to see published on Steam. The highest voted software is then considered by Valve for a global Steam release.

But reports from Valve's Steam Dev Days event on Wednesday quote Valve boss Gabe Newell as saying the firm is looking to make the voting system 'go away'. Newell's revelation was Tweeted by various attending developers, including Hot Blooded Games CFO and Marketing director Dave Oshry.

"Our goal is to make Greenlight go away," Oshry quoted Newell as saying. "Not because it's not useful, but because we're evolving."

Newell reportedly spoke of breaking down the barriers between developers and Steam publishing, potentially opening up the platform to more indie developers and their games, perhaps in similar ways to Apple's iTunes App Store.

Greenlight suffered a troubled launch, being initially plagued with spam posts containing fake projects and 'jokes', or requests for titles such as the Origin-only Battlefield 3 or 'Half-Life 3'.

Valve announced on Wednesday that Steam has grown to 75 million registered users, up 15 percent in the three months since its October announcement of 65 million users.

The firm also revealed significant changes planned for the Steam Controller, which will reportedly lose its central touch screen and gain traditional face buttons, and its plan to bring music, TV and movies to SteamOS before its final public launch.

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